#Since2020: Shows that got Montclair State students through the pandemic

During the first week of March, The Montclarion will post content related to the two-year commemoration of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and the effect it has had on the University campus community. of State of Montclair #Since2020.

Two years ago, the world looked like the endless television series “The Walking Dead”. But instead of zombies invading our homes and terrorizing our lives with the fear of being bitten, we faced the fear of being infected with the coronavirus (COVID-19) even when we were stuck inside.

As the pandemic continued, it took a click of a new TV show for students at Montclair State University to find solace.

Now they remember the shows that kept them company while they were stuck in their bedrooms.

For Jaime DiDomenico, a fifth-year family science and human development major, she turned to acting during the lockdown.

She watched the animated Fox television sitcom “Bob’s Burgers” which follows the life of restaurateur Bob Belcher and his dysfunctional family of his wife, Linda, and their three children, Tina, Gene and Louise, as they run a burger restaurant and run into daily misadventures.

“I’m a huge comedy fan, especially ‘Bob’s Burgers,'” DiDomenico said. “It’s not just the situations the characters find themselves in, but it’s the characters themselves that you love so much with great strokes [who] feel like real people. You can watch the same episodes a million times and still laugh.

Jaime DiDomenico, a fifth-year family science and human development student, turned to acting.
Mya Whyte | The Montclarion

DiDomenico said “Bob’s Burgers” made him smile, which was hard to do during such a difficult time.

“I was very depressed during the pandemic and always found humor to be the best medicine for me, especially this show,” DiDomenico said.

“Bob’s Burgers” follows the life of restaurateur Bob Belcher and his dysfunctional family.
Photo courtesy of Fox

While most people watch TV shows to connect with characters or find solace in a plot, Ben Strong, a musical theater scholar, has watched the actors and their acting.

Strong found it in “Better Call Saul,” a Netflix series that serves as a prequel to the hit series “Breaking Bad.” Instead of infamous meth dealer Walter White, we focus on his lawyer, Saul Goodman (originally Jimmy McGill), who was once a minor league lawyer fighting for low-income patrons and criminals.

Ben Strong, a senior musical theater student, watched

Ben Strong, a senior musical theater student, watched “Better Call Saul” during the pandemic. Mya Whyte | The Montclarion

“We weren’t able to take live or in-person classes because of the pandemic,” Strong said. “You know, we’re all actors, so it was tough. ‘Better Call Saul’ was a less stressful way to appreciate something but also to remind myself how much I love acting because all the actors on this show are so talented.

“Better Call Saul” serves as a prequel to “Breaking Bad.”
Photo courtesy of CMA

People usually watch TV shows to release stress. Musical theater student Miranda Wolf has attended both shows and movies with her boyfriend.

“So my boyfriend had never seen ‘Star Wars’ or any of the movies,” Wolf said. “I’m a big ‘Star Wars’ nerd, so we watched all the movies and ‘The Mandalorian’.”

Miranda Wolf, a graduate in musical theater, found solace in the

Miranda Wolf, a musical theater major, found solace in the “Star Wars” franchise.
Mya Whyte | The Montclarion

Like Wolf, many people have found solace in the “Star Wars” franchise and warped into an alternate reality during the pandemic to find relief.

“It was [kind of] escapism in a way because it’s such a different world,” Wolf said. “It’s not a realistic TV show, so it was [kind of] nice not to think about what’s going on outside.

Many people have found solace in the “Star Wars” franchise and turned to an alternate reality during the pandemic to find relief.  Photo courtesy of 20th Century Fox

Many people have found solace in the “Star Wars” franchise.
Photo courtesy of 20th Century Fox

Some people have drifted to different universes to cope, but Mario Díaz, a television and digital media specialist, throws himself headlong into action shows like “Cobra Kai.”

He started the show at the start of the pandemic because he hadn’t watched it before and suddenly had more time.

“It was more of a fun thing to watch,” Díaz said.

Mario Díaz, a specialist in television and media production, appreciated

Mario Díaz, a television and digital media specialist, enjoyed “Cobra Kai”.
Mya Whyte | The Montclarion

“Cobra Kai” is a Netflix original series set 34 years after the end of the original 1984 film “Karate Kid”, where the rivalry between two former karate competitors, Johnny Lawrence and Daniel LaRusso, is reignited when Johnny reopens the infamous Cobra Dojo Kai.

Although Díaz watched this show as a distraction from being locked out and working his part-time job, the reality reared its ugly head and reminded him of what he missed most: playing sports.

“‘Cobra Kai’ [is] about karate, which is a sport,” Díaz said. “I play sports. I love to go outside to play volleyball, basketball or baseball, so since I couldn’t do that, it took a beating.

“Cobra Kai” is a Netflix original series set 34 years after the end of the original “Karate Kid” movie.
Photo courtesy of Netflix

No matter what shows students crave, television has played not only a big role in the pandemic, but an even bigger role in helping people cope through such a difficult time.